marauderosu: (Default)
Tonight, we look at the big winner at the 21st Academy Awards, Hamlet.

Hamlet


Hamlet was an adaptation of William Shakespeare's play adapted, directed by, and starred Sir Laurence Olivier. It is the only one of Olivier's directorial efforts to be filmed in black and white, and was the first British movie to win the Academy Award for Best Picture. The movie was nominated for seven awards and won four. In addition to Best Picture, it also won Best Actor (Olivier), Best Art Decoration-Set Decoration, Black and White (Roger Furse and Carmen Dillon), and Best Costume Design, Black and White (Furse).

For more information abou the 21st Academy Awards, go to:
http://www.oscars.org/awards/academyawards/legacy/ceremony/21st.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/21st_Academy_Awards
marauderosu: (Default)
Tonight, we look at the big winner at the 20th Academy Awards, Gentleman's Agreement.

Gentleman's Agreement


Gentleman's Agreement starred Gregory Peck, Dorothy McGuire, John Garfield, Celeste Holm, June Havoc, and Anne Revere. It was based on Laura Z. Hobson's 1947 novel of the same name. The movie was nominated for eight awards and won three. In addition to Best Picture, it also won Best Supporting Actress (Celeste Holm) and Best Director (Elia Kazan).

For more information about the 20th Academy Awards, go to:
http://www.oscars.org/awards/academyawards/legacy/ceremony/20th.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/20th_Academy_Awards
marauderosu: (Wolf)
Tonight, we look at the big winner at the 19th Academy Awards, The Best Years of Our Lives.

The Best Years of Our Lives


The Best Years of Our Lives starred Fredric March, Myrna Loy, Dana Andrews, Teresa Wright, Virginia Mayo, and Harold Russell, and was directed by William Wyler. It is about three United States servicemen trying to piece their lives back together after coming home from World War II. The movie was nominated for eight awards and won seven. In addition to Best Picture, it also won Best Director (Wyler), Best Actor (March), Best Writing (Screenplay) (Robert E. Sherwood), Best Supporting Actor (Russell), Best Film Editing (Daniel Mandell), and Best Music (Score of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture) (Hugo Friedhofer). Also, Harold Russell received an Honorary Award "for bringing hope and courage to his fellow veterans through his appearance in The Best Years of Our Lives."

For more information about the 19th Academy Awards, go to:
http://www.oscars.org/awards/academyawards/legacy/ceremony/19th.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/19th_Academy_Awards
marauderosu: (Wolf)
Tonight, we look at the big winner at the 18th Academy Awards, The Lost Weekend.

The Lost Weekend


The Lost Weekend starred Ray Milland and Jane Wyman, and was directed by Billy Wilder. It was based on a novel of the same title by Charles R. Jackson about a writer who drinks heavily. It was nominated for a total for seven awards and won four. In addition to Best Picture, it also won for Best Director (Wilder), Best Actor (Milland), and Best Screenplay (Billy Wilder and Charles Brackett).

For more information about the 18th Academy Awards, go to:
http://www.oscars.org/awards/academyawards/legacy/ceremony/18th.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/18th_Academy_Awards
marauderosu: (Wolf)
Tonight, we look at the big winner at the 17th Academy Awards, Going My Way.

Going My Way


Going My Way starred Bing Crosby and Barry Fitzgerald, and was directed by Leo McCarey. The movie is about a new young priest taking over a parish from an established old veteran. It was nominated for a total of ten Academy Awards, winning seven. In addition to Best Picture, it also won for Best Director (McCarey), Best Actor (Crosby), Best Writing, Screenplay (Frank Butler and Frank Cavett) Best Original Motion Picture Story (McCarey), Best Supporting Actor (Fitzgerald), and Best Music, Song ("Swinging on a Star", written by James Van Heusen and Johnny Burke).

For more information about the 17th Academy Awards, go to:
http://www.oscars.org/awards/academyawards/legacy/ceremony/17th.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/17th_Academy_Awards
marauderosu: (Wolf)
Tonight, we look at the big winner at the 16th Academy Awards, Casablanca.

Casablanca


Casablanca starred Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman and Paul Henreid, and featured Claude Rains, Conrad Veidt, Sydney Greenstreet, Peter Lorre and Dooley Wilson. It was directed by Michael Curtiz, and was based on the unpublished stage play Everybody Comes to Rick's by Murray Burnett and Joan Alison. In addition to Best Picture, it also won for Best Director (Curtiz), and Best Writing, Screenplay (Julius J. Epstein, Phillip G. Epstein, and Howard Koch), and was nominated for a total of eight awards.

Today, Casablanca is considered one of the greatest movies of all time, according to many lists and critics (including myself). "Here's looking at you, kid."

For more information about the 16th Academy Awards, go to:
http://www.oscars.org/awards/academyawards/legacy/ceremony/16th.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/16th_Academy_Awards
marauderosu: (Wolf)
Tonight, we look at the big winner at the 15th Academy Awards, Mrs. Miniver.

Mrs. Miniver


Mrs. Miniver starred Greer Garson, Walter Pidgeon, and Teresa Wright, and was directed by William Wyler. It was based on the fictional English housewife created by Jan Struther in 1937 for a series of newspaper columns. In addition to Best Picture, it also won for Best Director (Wyler), Best Actress (Garson), Best Supporting Actress (Wright), Best Writing, Screenplay (George Froeschel, James Hilton, Claudine West, Arthur Wimperis), and Best Cinematography, Black-and-White (Joseph Ruttenberg), and was nominated for a total of twelve awards.

For more information about the 15th Academy Awards, go to:
http://www.oscars.org/awards/academyawards/legacy/ceremony/15th.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/15th_Academy_Awards
marauderosu: (Wolf)
Tonight, we look at the big winner at the 14th Academy Awards, How Green Was My Valley.

How Green Was My Valley


How Green Was My Valley starred Walter Pidgeon, Maureen O'Hara, Anna Lee, Donald Crisp, and Roddy McDowall, and was directed by John Ford. In addition to Best Picture, it also won Best Director (Ford), Best Supporting Actor (Crisp), Best Black-and-White Cinematography (Arthur C. Miller), and Best Black-and-White Art Direction-Interior Decoration (Richard Day, Nathan H. Juran and Thomas Little). It was nominated for a total of ten awards, and beat out for Best Picture such classics as Citizen Kane, The Maltese Falcon, and Sergeant York.

HGWMV often gets put down today because of the fact that it beat out Citizen Kane, but that doesn't mean it's not a great movie. In retrospect, it was simply the right choice at the time. Citizen Kane was not all that popular at the time of its release, and publisher William Randolph Hearst had declared war on it in his newspapers, mainly because the film was a thinly disguised portrait of him. HGWMV, on the other hand, seemed to better reflect the mood and social attitude of the time period. It would be many years before the general public would recognize Citizen Kane as the great film it is.

For more information about the 14th Academy Awards, go to:
http://www.oscars.org/awards/academyawards/legacy/ceremony/14th.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/14th_Academy_Awards
marauderosu: (Wolf)
Tonight, we look at the big winner at the 13th Academy Awards, Rebecca.

Rebecca


Rebecca starred Laurence Olivier, Joan Fontaine, and Judith Anderson, and was directed by Alfred Hitchcock. In addition to Best Picture, the movie also won Best Cinematography, Black and White (George Barnes) and was nominated for nine other awards. Also, since the introduction of awards for actors in supporting roles, this is the only film named Best Picture that won no other Academy Award for acting, directing or writing.

There were many great movies up for the top award that year. I have never seen this particular one, but I believe that The Grapes of Wrath, The Great Dictator, and The Philadelphia Story would've been great choices as well.

For more information about the 13th Academy Awards, go to:
http://www.oscars.org/awards/academyawards/legacy/ceremony/13th.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/13th_Academy_Awards
marauderosu: (Wolf)
Tonight, we look at the big winner at the 12th Academy Awards, Gone with the Wind.

Gone with the Wind


Gone with the Wind starred Clark Gable, Vivien Leigh, Leslie Howard, Olivia de Havilland, and Hattie McDaniel, and was based on the novel of the same name by Margaret Mitchell. It tells a story of the American Civil War and Reconstruction era from a white Southern point of view. The movie received ten awards (eight competitive, two honorary), a record that stood for 20 years until Ben-Hur surpassed it in 1960. It was nominated for a total of thirteen.

IMHO, Gone with the Wind is probably the most overrated, overhyped, and overloved movie of all time. From Wikipedia:

Recent historical studies of the Civil Rights Movement have focused on the idyllic portrayal (epitomised in the opening credits) of the Civil War-era South in the film. Professor D.J. Reynolds wrote that "The white women are elegant, their menfolk noble or at least dashing. And, in the background, the black slaves are mostly dutiful and content, clearly incapable of an independent existence." Reynolds likened Gone with the Wind to Birth of a Nation (based on The Clansman) and other re-imaginings of the South during the era of segregation, in which white Southerners are portrayed as defending traditional values and the issue of slavery is largely ignored. Hattie McDaniel's performance (for which she became the first black American to win an Oscar) and Butterfly McQueen's have been described as stereotypes of a 'black Mammy' and a child-like black slave (in the novel, the character of Prissy was twelve years old, but played in the film by an adult). Malcolm X recalled that "when Butterfly McQueen went into her act, I felt like crawling under the rug."


My first choice would've been either Mr. Smith Goes to Washington or even The Wizard of Oz, both films which are still culturally and socially relevant today.

For more information about the 12th Academy Awards, go to:
http://www.oscars.org/awards/academyawards/legacy/ceremony/12th.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/12th_Academy_Awards
marauderosu: (Wolf)
Tonight, we look at the big winner at the 11th Academy Awards, You Can't Take It With You.

You Can't Take It With You


You Can't Take It With You starred Jean Arthur, Lionel Barrymore, James Stewart, and Edward Arnold, and was directed by Frank Capra. The movie is about a man from a family of rich snobs who becomes engaged to a woman from a good-natured but decidedly eccentric family. In addition to Best Picture, Capra also won his third Best Director award. It was also nominated for Best Supporting Actress (Spring Byington), Best Writing, Screenplay (Robert Riskin), Best Cinematography (Joseph Walker), Best Film Editing (Gene Havlick), and Best Sound, Recording (John P. Livadary).

For more information about the 11th Academy Awards, go to:
http://www.oscars.org/awards/academyawards/legacy/ceremony/11th.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/11th_Academy_Awards
marauderosu: (Wolf)
Tonight, we look at the big winner at the 10th Academy Awards, The Life of Emile Zola.

The Life of Emile Zola


The Life of Emile Zola starred Paul Muni, Gloria Holden, Gale Sondergaard, and Joseph Schlidkraut. It is a biographical movie about French author Émile Zola. In addition to Best Picture, it also won awards for Best Supporting Actor (Schlidkraut) and Best Writing, Screenplay (Heinz Herald, Geza Herczeg and Norman Reilly Raine), and it was nominated for seven other awards as well, becoming the first movie to receive ten nominations.

For more information about the 10th Academy Awards, go to:
http://www.oscars.org/awards/academyawards/legacy/ceremony/10th.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/10th_Academy_Awards
marauderosu: (Wolf)
Tonight, we look at the big winner at the 9th Academy Awards, The Great Ziegfeld.

The Great Ziegfeld


The Great Ziegfeld starred William Powell, Myrna Loy, and Luise Rainer. In addition to Best Picture, it won awards for Best Actress (Rainer) and Best Dance Direction, and was nominated for an additional four. As of this entry, Luise Rainer is the earliest nominee or winner in any acting category who is still living. She also holds the record for the longest-lived acting winner ever, at age 102.

However, my personal first choice for Best Picture that year would've been Mr. Deeds Goes to Town, a screwball comedy starring Gary Cooper and Jean Arthur, and directed by Frank Capra, who won Best Director that year.

For more information about the 9th Academy Awards, go to:
http://www.oscars.org/awards/academyawards/legacy/ceremony/9th.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/9th_Academy_Awards
marauderosu: (Wolf)
Tonight, we look at the big winner at the 8th Academy Awards, Mutiny on the Bounty.

Mutiny on the Bounty


Mutiny on the Bounty starred Charles Laughton and Clark Gable, and was based on the novel of the same name. It was nominated for eight awards, including its top two stars and Franchot Tone for Best Actor. However, it only won one. But it was the one which mattered the most: Best Picture. It was the last movie to date to win Best Picture and nothing else.

For more information about the 8th Academy Awards, go to:
http://www.oscars.org/awards/academyawards/legacy/ceremony/8th.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/8th_Academy_Awards
marauderosu: (Wolf)
Tonight, we look at the big winner at the 7th Academy Awards, It Happened One Night.

It Happened One Night


It Happened One Night starred Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert, and was directed by Frank Capra. Gable plays an unemployed newspaper reporter who follows around a pampered socialite (Colbert) who is trying to get out from under her father's thumb. He's in search of a big story, but he ends up falling in love with her. This movie won all five Academy Awards for which it was nominated: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress, and Best Writing, Adaption (Robert Riskin). In fact, it was the first movie to sweep the "Big Five" awards. To date, only two other movies have achieved this feat: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975) and The Silence of the Lambs (1991). Also, It Happened One Night was the last movie to win both lead acting Academy Awards, until One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest did it.

For more information about the 7th Academy Awards, go to:
http://www.oscars.org/awards/academyawards/legacy/ceremony/7th.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/7th_Academy_Awards
marauderosu: (Wolf)
Tonight, we look at the big winner at the 6th Academy Awards, Cavalcade.

Cavalcade


Cavalcade starred Diana Wynyard, Clive Brook, Una O'Connor, and Herbert Mundin. In addition to Best Picture, it also won Best Director (Frank Lloyd) and Best Art Direction (William S. Darling). Diana Wynyard was nominated for Best Actress, but lost to Katharine Hepburn for Morning Glory.

For more information about the 6th Academy Awards, go to:
http://www.oscars.org/awards/academyawards/legacy/ceremony/6th.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/6th_Academy_Awards
marauderosu: (Wolf)
Tonight, we look at the big winner at the 5th Academy Awards, Grand Hotel.

Grand Hotel


Grand Hotel starred Greta Garbo, John Barrymore, Joan Crawford, Wallace Beery, Lionel Barrymore, Lewis Stone, and Jean Hersholt. It was the only Best Picture winner to be nominated for Best Picture and nothing else. It was also the last film to win Best Picture without a Best Director nomination until Driving Miss Daisy (1989).

For more information about the 5th Academy Awards, go to:
http://www.oscars.org/awards/academyawards/legacy/ceremony/5th.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/5th_Academy_Awards
marauderosu: (Wolf)
Tonight, we look at the big winner at the 4th Academy Awards, Cimarron.

Cimarron


Cimarron starred Richard Dix and Irene Dunne. It was the first Western to win the top award, and the only one until Dances With Wolves did it in 1990. It won two other awards for Writing and Art Direction. Today, however, Cimarron is frequently cited as one of the most undeserving Best Picture winners because of its racist overtones and scattershot storytelling. IMHO, it should've lost to The Front Page.

For more information about the 4th Academy Awards, go to:
http://www.oscars.org/awards/academyawards/legacy/ceremony/4th.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/4th_Academy_Awards
marauderosu: (Wolf)
Tonight, we look at the big winner at the 3rd Academy Awards, All Quiet on the Western Front.

All Quiet on the Western Front


All Quiet on the Western Front starred Lew Ayres as a schoolboy who is duped by his instructor into joining the Army and "saving the Fatherland". It also starred Louis Wolheim. Today, this movie is considered one of the greatest anti-war movies ever made. It was the first movie to win the awards for both Outstanding Production (now Best Picture) and Best Director (Lewis Milestone), a feat which would be come very common in later years.

For more information about the 3rd Academy Awards, go to:
http://www.oscars.org/awards/academyawards/legacy/ceremony/3rd.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/3rd_Academy_Awards
marauderosu: (Wolf)
Tonight, we look at the big winner at the 2nd Academy Awards, The Broadway Melody.

The Broadway Melody


The Broadway Melody starred Charles King, Anita Page, Bessie Love, and Jed Prouty. It was the first musical released by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and the first all-sound Hollywood musical. Unfortunately, this movie has aged very poorly, especially when compared to the later batch of musicals which would come from the MGM studio. From Wikipedia:

The Broadway Melody was a substantial success. It was the top grossing picture of 1929, and won the Academy Award for Best Picture. Historically, it is often considered the first complete example of the Hollywood musical. However, the film has since come to be seen as weak, cliché-ridden, and overly melodramatic. Even in 1929, the creaky stereotypes of backstage show biz were something less than fresh. Most believe that the primary reason for its success in the Academy Awards was due to the films with which it competed being equally unimpressive. Filmsite.org describes the 1929 Oscars as follows: "The films nominated for this year's awards were some of the weakest films in the history of American cinema, reflecting the chaos of the transition from silents to sound films."


For more information about the 2nd Academy Awards, go to:
http://www.oscars.org/awards/academyawards/legacy/ceremony/2nd.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2nd_Academy_Awards

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